American claims African region as kingdom so daughter can be a princess

53c02523c827c.image_

A white American man travelled to a region between Sudan and Egypt called Bir Tawil and planted a flag there. He renamed it North Sudan, declared it his kingdom, and his daughter is now a “princess”.

A Virginia man claimed a kingdom so his daughter could be a princess. Jeremiah Heaton, who has three children, recently trekked across the Egyptian desert to a small, mountainous region between Egypt and Sudan called Bir Tawil.

The area, about 800 square miles, is claimed by neither Sudan nor Egypt, the result of land disputes dating back more than 100 years. Since then, there have been several online claimants to the property, but Heaton believes his physical journey to the site, where he planted a flag designed by his children, means he rightfully can claim it. And call his 7-year-old daughter Princess Emily, the fulfillment of a promise he made months earlier.

“Over the winter, Emily and I were playing, and she has a fixation on princesses. She asked me, in all seriousness, if she’d be a real princess someday,” Heaton said. “And I said she would.” He said he started researching what it would take for him to become a king, so Emily could be a princess. As it turns out, Bir Tawil is among the last pieces of unclaimed land on earth.

Heaton, who works in the mining industry and unsuccessfully ran for Congress in 2012, got permission from the Egyptian government to travel through the country to the Bir Tawil region. “It’s beautiful there,” Heaton said. “It’s an arid desert in Northeastern Africa. Bedouins roam the area; the population is actually zero.”

In June, he took the 14-hour caravan journey through the desert, in time to plant the flag of the Heaton kingdom — blue with the seal and stars representing members of the family — in Bir Tawil soil. When Heaton got home, he and his wife, Kelly, got their daughter a princess crown, and asked family members to address her as Princess Emily. “It’s cool,” said Emily, who sleeps in a custom-made castle bed fit for royalty.

She added that as princess she wants to make sure children in the region have food.

“I feel confident in the claim we’ve made,” Heaton said. “That’s the exact same process that has been done for thousands of years. The exception is this nation was claimed for love.”

“That’s definitely a concern in that part of the world,” Heaton said. “We discussed what we could do as a nation to help.”

Heaton named the land the Kingdom of North Sudan, after consulting with his children.“I do intend to pursue formal recognition with African nations,” Heaton said, adding that getting Sudan and Egypt to recognize the kingdom would be the first step. That’s basically what will have to happen for Heaton to have any legal claim to sovereignty, said Shelia Carapico, professor of political science and international studies at the University of Richmond. She said it’s not plausible for someone to plant a flag and say they have political control over the land without legal recognition from neighboring countries, the United Nations or other groups. In addition, she said, it’s not known whether people have ownership of the land, regardless of whether the property is part of a political nation.

Heaton said his children, Emily, Justin and Caleb, will be the drivers for what happens with the new nation.

“If we can turn North Sudan into an agricultural hub for the area … a lot of technology has gone into agriculture and water,” he said. “These are the things [the kids] are concerned with.”

“I think there’s a lot of love in the world,” Heaton said. “I want my children to know I will do absolutely anything for them.”

In November, Deadline revealed that Disney and Super Size Me director Morgan Spurlock’s production company (Warrior Poets) are developing a feature film based on this story. The working title is Princess Of North Sudan.

source:http://thisisafrica.me/lifestyle/american-claims-african-region-kingdom-daughter-can-princess/?fb_action_ids=1688235808067609&fb_action_types=og.comments

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s